NHS statement on vaginal mesh

As of 10 July 2018, NHS Improvement and NHS England implemented a 'period of high vigilance restriction regarding vaginal mesh.'

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As of 10 July 2018, NHS Improvement and NHS England implemented a ‘period of high vigilance restriction regarding vaginal mesh.’

In response to a recommendation by the Independent Medicines and Medical Devices Safety Review, the government and NHS have ‘paused’ the use of vaginally inserted surgical mesh for stress urinary incontinence until a set of conditions to ensure that patients receive safe and high-quality care are met. This pause has been extended to include vaginally inserted surgical mesh for pelvic organ prolapse and will be implemented through a high vigilance programme of restricted practice.

Credit: Gov.uk

For the majority of patients, mesh surgery should not be performed during this period of high vigilance restriction. Read more here.

What is mesh?

Mesh is the general term used to describe different materials used as medical devices in surgical procedures to provide extra support for weakened or damaged tissue.

Mesh can be successfully used for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) and pelvic organ prolapse (POP). However, some women experience complications which can lead to debilitating injuries.

Find out more about the symptoms from NHS England, here.

If you experience any complications, you must inform your healthcare professional.

Here is a list of units for women who have suffered vaginal mesh complications that your healthcare professional can refer you to: central database

Your doctor should report the complication to a national registry.

For more information on the high vigilance restriction visit the Royal College of Obstructions and Gynaecologists: Mesh safety alert and  see NICE draft guideline for further guidance.

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