Professor Andrew Horne – New treatments for Endometriosis

 Repurposing of anticancer drugs to treat endometriosis

Professor Andrew Horne: Re-purposing of anticancer drugs to treat endometriosis

Endometriosis affects 1 in 10 women – nearly two million women in the UK.
It costs the UK £8.2 billion per year in NHS budget and lost income, however treatments have barely progressed over the last 50 years.
There is an urgent need for new treatments for endometriosis.
Endometriosis is condition when endometrial cells, similar to the lining of the womb, grow outside the uterus, for example in the pelvis, ovaries or fallopian tube. Endometriosis is managed surgically or medically, but symptoms recur after surgery in 75% of women and often have unwanted side effects.
With previous funding from Wellbeing of Women, Professor Horne, at The University of Edinburgh, has discovered that endometriosis cells act in a similar way to cancer cells in order to grow and survive. This means that using safe anticancer drugs in small doses may be effective against endometriosis.
The team hope to determine whether anticancer drugs in small doses may be effective against endometriosis.
If successful, this could transform the lives of millions of women living with this debilitating condition.
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